Friday, 12 May 2017

Jeremy Corbyn rejects claims he is a pacifist



Jeremy Corbyn has rejected claims he is a pacifist, saying he accepts that military action "under international law and as a genuine last resort" is sometimes necessary.
 
In a major speech outlining his approach to defence and foreign policy, the Labour leader said it was an "extraordinary question" to be asked whether he would countenance pressing the nuclear button.


While he said the party was committed to pursuing disarmament and had a policy of "no first use" of nuclear weapons, he would "do everything necessary to protect the safety and security of our people and our country".


Speaking at the Chatham House think-tank in London, Mr Corbyn cautioned against a "bomb first, talk later" approach to foreign policy.


He said the world was "more unstable than even at the height of the Cold War" because of a failed approach to international security, with botched foreign interventions making the world a "more dangerous place".


Jeremy Corbyn has rejected claims he is a pacifist, saying he accepts that military action "under international law and as a genuine last resort" is sometimes necessary.
 
 
In a major speech outlining his approach to defence and foreign policy, the Labour leader said it was an "extraordinary question" to be asked whether he would countenance pressing the nuclear button.


While he said the party was committed to pursuing disarmament and had a policy of "no first use" of nuclear weapons, he would "do everything necessary to protect the safety and security of our people and our country".


Speaking at the Chatham House think-tank in London, Mr Corbyn cautioned against a "bomb first, talk later" approach to foreign policy.


He said the world was "more unstable than even at the height of the Cold War" because of a failed approach to international security, with botched foreign interventions making the world a "more dangerous place".


"But that is very far from the kind of unilateral wars and interventions that have almost become routine in recent times."
 
 
Mr Corbyn has previously made clear he would never authorise the use of nuclear weapons and said that if it were to ever emerge as a "real option" it would represent a "cataclysmic failure" by world leaders.


He said: "If circumstances arose where that was a real option, it would represent complete and cataclysmic failure. It would mean world leaders had already triggered a spiral of catastrophe for humankind."




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